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written by Admin on February 22, 2020

The Friends reunion is officially happening (finally) at HBO Max

It turns out after all this time the cast of Friends was just on a break.

After years of speculation and pleading from fans, a Friends reunion is finally, officially, happening. Could we BE any more excited?

The original six cast members — Jennifer Aniston, Courteney CoxLisa KudrowMatt LeBlancMatthew Perry, and David Schwimmer — will reunite for an exclusive untitled unscripted special on WarnerMedia’s new streaming platform HBO Max. When HBO Max launches in May, the unscripted reunion special and all 236 episodes of the beloved NBC series will be available to subscribers.

Guess you could call this the one where they all got back together — we are reuniting with David, Jennifer, Courteney, Matt, Lisa, and Matthew for an HBO Max special that will be programmed alongside the entire Friends library,” said Kevin Reilly, chief content officer, HBO Max and president, TBS, TNT, and truTV, in a statement. “I became aware of Friends when it was in the very early stages of development and then had the opportunity to work on the series many years later and have delighted in seeing it catch on with viewers generation after generation. It taps into an era when friends – and audiences – gathered together in real time and we think this reunion special will capture that spirit, uniting original and new fans.”

The cast were the first to announce the news on their social media pages. Five of the six all shared the same image of the cast with the words, “It’s happening.” Always the class clown, LeBlanc changed things up, sharing a photo of the original cast of M*A*S*H.

Ben Winston (The Late Late Show With James Corden) will direct the special and will executive produce along with Friends executive producers Kevin Bright, Marta Kauffman, and David Crane. All of the six core cast will also executive produce the special.

There have been many unofficial reunions over the years when the cast has spent time together outside of projects, and fans have speculated over the possibility for years.

Co-creator Marta Kauffman dismissed the idea of an official reunion as recently as 2015. The closest they’ve come thus far was during NBC’s 2016 tribute to director James Burrows — but crucially Matthew Perry was absent from the group. However, this unscripted reunion on HBO Max has been rumored since November.

written by Admin on February 11, 2020

THE ONE WHERE JENNIFER ANISTON GETS GRILLED BY SANDRA BULLOCK

Interview Magazine- Five hours and sixteen minutes. That’s all it took for Jennifer Aniston to hit one million followers on Instagram last fall. Most people would be shell-shocked by that record-setting rush of attention. But not Aniston, who knows a thing or two about being followed. A paparazzi magnet and tabloid fixture since the mid-’90s, when she launched a thousand haircuts as Rachel Green on the generational sitcom Friends, the Emmy-winning actor, now 51, has been an object of our affection and fascination for half her life. Her made-for-Us Weekly romances aside, Aniston is one of the few actors of her era to seamlessly transition her superstardom from the small screen to the big one and back again. She brought the same pinpoint timing and breezy sarcasm that made her one of TV’s highest-paid entertainers to broad comedies such as Office Space, Along Came Polly, and The Break-Up, while recalibrating expectations with quietly devastating turns in dramas including The Good Girl and Cake.

And just when we thought we had America’s Sweetheart figured out, she surprised everyone by returning to television in the palace-intrigue drama The Morning Show, to play a fiery anchor, alongside Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carell, grappling with age and power dynamics in the #MeToo era. And while the parallels between Aniston and her character might be tempting to draw, the truth, she tells her friend and drinking buddy Sandra Bullock, is stranger than tabloids.

———

JENNIFER ANISTON: Hi, mama.

SANDRA BULLOCK: Hi, sweetheart. Are you in your jammies?

ANISTON: No, I’m in jeans and a sweater and a black t-shirt. Do you feel good about that?

BULLOCK: Who are you wearing?

ANISTON: [Laughs] I’m wearing Rag & Bone jeans and an Elder Statesman sweater.

BULLOCK: Jewelry?

ANISTON: Of course. And a James Perse t-shirt underneath the sweater.

BULLOCK: Layering.

ANISTON: And then Hanky Panky underwear if we want to get real specific.

BULLOCK: So can I say, “Jen was casually chic for the interview, layered in light cottons and some cashmere, with her legs tucked up under her, as she snuggled on the couch?”

ANISTON: Let me jump up and get snuggly, hold on. Yes, now you can say that.

BULLOCK: I already said it. It’s been recorded and I’m not going to repeat myself. We were trying to remember how we first met, and you and I had completely different memories.

ANISTON: Let’s journey back. I’m trying to remember the year of the Golden Globes, at that little restaurant. CAA always had that party.

BULLOCK: Yes, and we were introduced by our former boyfriend. I say “our” because you and I both partook of this one human being.

ANISTON: Yes, we did. That’s a beautiful way of saying it.

BULLOCK: Jennifer, why do you think it took so long for you and Sandra to connect?

ANISTON: I think everything happens in its own time, and I think for whatever reason, life had to happen in both of our worlds the way it did.

BULLOCK: I was trying to think of my first impression of you, and, like almost everyone’s first impression of you, it was on the television. And I was trying to remember if that was the person who I got to meet. I remember the first thing I thought of you was, “A beautiful woman who has extraordinary timing is almost impossible to find.” You allowed yourself to look foolish, heartbroken, clumsy, like an idiot. I think that’s why everyone feels so comfortable in your presence. You said, “Yeah, I might look like this, but guess what? I have the same failings and insecurities you do.” I remember thinking, “God, I hope she’s really like that. If she’s not, I’m going to be so bummed.”

ANISTON: So pissed.

BULLOCK: I mean, you can be an asshole but you’re so charming! You really have a way of pushing joy and positivity. You do that in your work, but you also do it so effortlessly with everyone you allow into your home and into your life. Anyone who has the honor of being in your home and in your life doesn’t want to leave because it’s safe, it’s emotional, it’s joyous. What is it that allows you to stay buoyant and keep from getting discouraged when things don’t go the right way?

ANISTON: First of all, that was the sweetest thing anyone has ever said to me. I think that it comes from growing up in a household that was destabilized and felt unsafe, watching adults being unkind to each other, and witnessing certain things about human behavior that made me think: “I don’t want to do that. I don’t want to be that. I don’t want to experience this feeling I’m having in my body right now. I don’t want anyone else that I ever come in contact with ever to feel that.” So I guess I have my parents to thank. You can either be angry or be a martyr, or you can say, “You’ve got lemons? Let’s make lemonade.”

BULLOCK: That’s another way we can relate to each other, in that the destabilizing things in life can either sink you or invigorate you to change and do better. I look at you at your dinner table, because you sit at the same place all the time, and you are surrounded by these extraordinary people that you’ve known for so long. Everyone is along for the journey, and you share. The conversation about women supporting each other and coming together is new.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANISTON: The conversation is new.

BULLOCK: And in your world the action is not. Everyone sits at that table as the head of the table. Everyone has a voice. And I just get to sit back and go, “I’m so lucky to sit here with my family and be a part of this world.” You share your wealth, the wealth of your friendships. You literally go, “Here are my friends, they’re going to love you, too. Here’s my family, they’re going to love you, too. Here’s my home, stay as long as you want.” That’s a rare thing. A lot of people don’t have that. They’re afraid to share because they’re afraid to lose something. You go through life as though you’re not afraid to lose anything, and that’s really inspiring.

ANISTON: I feel that same way about you. Like you said, this conversation of women supporting women is new, but I think we have been doing it for a long time. When I landed in Los Angeles at 20 years old and I fell into those girls who are still sitting around the table today, they were on a different path. I’d never had a circle of women who got together and talked forever. I was like, “God, these California people don’t shut up. They talk about their feelings and cry in front of each other.” I said to myself, “Here I am, a girl who grew up in New York City, and now I find myself in Laurel Canyon, wearing a flowery dress and someone put a crystal around my neck and is burning sage around my head. I have landed on Mars.” But I really think it was something that saved me. This is a really tough business that we’re in that is not always kind or inclusive or supportive. A lot of the time, it’s the opposite. I remember going to auditions and girls would never want to share anything. Or they would talk to you during your auditions to distract you when they knew you were trying to work on your stuff.

BULLOCK: That was me, by the way, who did that to you.

ANISTON: That bone does not exist in that body of yours.

BULLOCK: “Hey Jen! Hey Jen! Hey Jen! Hey Jen!”

ANISTON: “What ya reading? What ya reading?”

BULLOCK: “What are you reading for? Is that the lead? Is that the lead? Is that the lead?” [Both laugh]

ANISTON: But that’s the truth!

BULLOCK: With The Morning Show, so many pieces had to work together for it to be a success. And then lightning has to strike. We all strive to make good work, but sometimes they’re stinkers. And I know you worked your ass off on this one. How does it feel to be given this second massive chapter?

ANISTON: I don’t know.

BULLOCK: Okay, fair enough. Is that your final answer?

ANISTON: Yeah, that’s it.

BULLOCK: That’s a terrible answer for my article.

ANISTON: D-U-N-N-O. Honestly, I think there was no attachment to a result, and I think that’s a real key to success in life, to not worry about the landing, but enjoy the experience. That’s what we did. We were focused on making something really great and interesting and a bit daring, and trying to be as honest as we could. But I think it’s about not having an attachment to the outcome.

BULLOCK: Which is not easy.

ANISTON: It’s not. I’ve never been that person pacing around on opening night saying, “What is the box-office?” I try to put it away when it’s done. We were having a writers’ meeting yesterday, and I was saying, “I feel so proud to be a part of something that people say so many nice things about.” It’s so rare. I mean, for some people it’s not that rare, but in my case, it’s hit or miss, and that’s okay. I’ve never had it take me down because, well, that’s not gonna be the thing that takes me down.

BULLOCK: You say you let it go, that you don’t worry about box-office, but as a woman, we don’t often get second chances. But you’ve maintained a career for all these years, and have arrived at a time when all of a sudden women are realizing their value at the box office.

ANISTON: Yes, and isn’t that exciting?

BULLOCK: We get to keep going. We don’t have a shelf life anymore. Our shelf life is whatever we want.

ANISTON: We create that. Our industry has expanded its horizons in that way, and I think it’s because women have stood up and said, “We’re mad as hell, and we’re not going to take it anymore.”

BULLOCK: That’s a great line, Jen.

ANISTON: I should write that into my first screenplay.

BULLOCK: Write it down. Don’t forget. Oh, it’s recorded. [Both laugh]

ANISTON: Think of the generation ahead of us. So many of those women were put out to pasture when they were 40, and the fact that we get to still be working and are actually coming into our most creative adventures ever at this point in our life—we’re rewriting that narrative that society sort of plastered on us. I remember the messaging to me even in my 30s was, “Don’t play a mom, and if you do play a mom make sure it’s to a 3-year-old kid.”

BULLOCK: Make sure you’re a hot mom.

ANISTON: And single! And the kid is just a baby.

BULLOCK: It’s just adorable.

ANISTON: That’s not the case anymore. You’ve sustained the same career from the time you were in your wee 20s. Is it just a fortunate window of time that we got to enter into the business when we did, and so this moment is happening? Whatever it is, we won’t ever be able to know because who gives a shit, it’s happening. Thirty years from now, we’ll get to look back—

BULLOCK: —And we’ll all be at the same nursing home. I’ll help you with your teeth, you’ll help me with my diapers.

ANISTON: I’m going to build it. You’re going to decorate it.

BULLOCK: We’ll all have a job.

ANISTON: We won’t even need those diapers and teeth because there’s so much new discovery in health and in our bodies and how we take care of ourselves.

BULLOCK: I’m so glad you brought that up because there’s something that you did—

ANISTON: Nice segue.

BULLOCK: What?

ANISTON: I said, “Nice segue.”

BULLOCK: You’re just talking too fucking much, Jennifer. Pipe down. You were just so intrigued by all this new health information that was coming out. It’s mental health, physical health, well-being, joy, and you started inviting us all to these lectures at your house where we could all learn together. You forced us out of our shells to participate. In this day and age, when everyone’s glued to their iPhone, it’s a great gift you’re giving everyone you love, because you’re like, “I plan on living to at least 115, and I’d like all my friends to be with me.”

ANISTON: I loved doing that. That came about right when The Morning Show came to a close, and I found myself going from a thousand miles an hour to zero. I was under my covers for a week going, “What do I do with my life?” It’s always been this dream of mine to have these little salons, where you find these wonderful minds to come in and speak and share the wealth. There’s no point in living to be 90 when you’re not thriving. If your body starts to break down then your mind breaks down, and your consciousness breaks down, and then you’re of no use to the world.

BULLOCK: What brings you sadness?

ANISTON: I thought you were going to say, “So, are you doing a reboot of Friends?”

BULLOCK: Speaking of Friends, everyone knows you as Rachel—buoyant, happy, always perky. What in real life is the thing that can take you down the quickest? Other than a pimple!

ANISTON: Turning on the television, listening to the news, reading the paper—that can make me really sad and really angry. The division that’s been taking place. The complete chaos that’s existing. When people show greed and bad behavior and a lack of gratitude. It’s so hard to put this in an eloquent way. When you see people behaving badly and hurting other people, that makes me very angry. And abuse of animals, obviously.

BULLOCK: I look at everyone who is trying to raise kids, and I go, “How are we supposed to raise children outside of a bubble? And show them the difference between right and wrong, and what kindness looks like, when it’s really hard to find it with all the noise on a screen?” Screens are everywhere.

ANISTON: Everywhere.

BULLOCK: Do you just keep pointing to a higher power, going: “You have to answer to that thing. Don’t look at anything here on Earth. Just point up there”?

ANISTON: You can protect your children as much as possible, but they’re eventually going to become an 18-year old and go out in the world and they’re going to see all of it.

BULLOCK: Not my kids.

ANISTON: They’re living with you for the rest of your life.

BULLOCK: I gave them the places where they can go to college because that’s where mommy feels comfortable living. I said, “You can go to these three colleges because I’m going to buy an apartment down the street.”

ANISTON: You’re actually building a college at the bottom of the hill right now. By the time Louis and Laila are at the right ages, it’ll be: “I’ll just drive you there every single day. We can even walk and make it a physical experience.”

BULLOCK: “Jen says we need to get in 20,000 steps a day.” I know you and I like to stay at home and be surrounded by the things that we’ve cultivated that are safe. It’s scary entering the world, but when we do, we feel good and we’re glad we did it. But the dread of being around people, I need to get better with that.

ANISTON: Aren’t I helping you with that?

BULLOCK: You’re not allowed to work out of town because my social life comes to a screeching halt and I just stay home, and that’s just not healthy, Jennifer Aniston!

ANISTON: Well, you do have a lovely home and a stunning man and two gorgeous children.

BULLOCK: What is it that you haven’t done yet that you are looking forward to doing? Is it on a work level? Is it on a spiritual evolvement level? Is it all of the above?

ANISTON: My gut reaction was to say all of the above. It’s not so much what I see myself doing, but it’s more like a little screenshot in my brain, where I hear the ocean, I see the ocean, I hear laughter, I see kids running, I hear ice in a glass, I smell food being cooked. That’s the joyous snapshot in my head.

BULLOCK: Am I at the beach house with you?

ANISTON: You’re at the beach house with me.

written by Admin on January 19, 2020

Jennifer attends the 26th Screen Actors Guild Awards

Jennifer attended the 26th Screen Actors Guild Awards in which she won Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series for her role as Alex Levy in The Morning Show, congrats Jennifer well deserved!❤️ I have added images from the event to our gallery enjoy!





written by Admin on January 19, 2020

2020 Winter TCA Tour – Day 13

Jennifer attended the 20120 Winter Tour alongside her This Morning Show cast, I’ve added the images to our gallery enjoy!


written by Admin on January 05, 2020

Jennifer attends the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards

Jennifer attended the Golden Globe Awards, I have added photos to our gallery enjoy!


written by Admin on December 11, 2019

Jennifer Aniston Doesn’t Need a Happy Ending

Elle- To reach Jennifer Aniston, you have to drive up and up and up, then announce yourself at a white gate that opens onto a field of gray pebbles sprouting symmetrical trees. A procession of stone slabs leads like a bridge to the massive bronze doors on an otherwise solid white facade. Aniston answers, casual in jeans and a black T-shirt. She’s disarmingly friendly. She thinks she knows another person with my name. She asks about the traffic. She leads me to her beautiful family room and kitchen, with its built-in pizza oven and glass-encased wine room, and offers to make us peppermint tea. She apologizes in advance for the texts she might get from her showrunner because she’s a month away from shooting her upcoming show with Reese Witherspoon. While she brews the tea, I plop my bag on the counter, like we’re just hanging out. I tell her my daughter drained my phone battery right before I left the house, and so we start chatting about kids and phones. How badly they want them. When they should be allowed to have them. Do you let them feel left out, or “Do you try to save their sanity by not letting them grow up inside a teeny computer? It’s a real internal conflict,” she says, carrying the mugs to the sofa. “So much is out there.” This is true. She would know.

Aniston spent a decade on Friends and has starred in more than 30 movies, but the role that sticks to her most tenaciously is America’s Suffering Sweetheart. Cast as the eternal ingenue in the never-ending marriage plot, her joys, heartbreaks, and 57,000 fictional pregnancies have kept the lights on at several tabloids for a quarter of a century. I know this character is a fiction, but she’s still an undeniable presence—a third person in the room, lounging in the hanging chair, eating perfectly cut crudités. “We live in a society that messages women: By this age, you should be married; by this age, you should have children,” Aniston says. “That’s a fairy tale. That’s the mold we’re slowly trying to break out of.”

“It is a grand mystery why the public obsession has never abated,” says Kristin Hahn, her producing partner and one of her best friends. “I’ve wondered about it myself for many years—I think Jen represents an archetype for us as a culture.” Aniston is the screen onto which America projects all its double standards about women, especially successful ones. We first got to know her as Rachel Green, the runaway bride who moved to New York City to become herself. Then we spent a decade emotionally invested in whether she would end up with Ross, only to have her perfect marriage to Brad Pitt end soon after that. It’s obviously a lucrative projection, or it would not have been bought and sold, year after year. What anyone gets out of it is unclear. “Maybe it has everything to do with what they’re lacking in their own life,” Aniston theorizes. Or maybe using marriage and children as the ultimate marker of female happiness is just another way to disempower successful women. “Why do we want a happy ending? How about just a happy existence? A happy process? We’re all in process constantly,” Aniston says. “What quantifies happiness in someone’s life isn’t the ideal that was created in the ’50s. It’s not like you hear that narrative about any men.” Men, of course, are allowed to continue merrily on their open-ended path to adventure. “That’s part of sexism—it’s always the woman who’s scorned and heartbroken and a spinster. It’s never the opposite. The unfortunate thing is, a lot of it comes from women,” she says. “Maybe those are women who haven’t figured out that they have the power, that they have the ability to achieve a sense of inner happiness.

The thing that’s surprisingly easy to forget about Aniston is just how powerful she is, because the amount of power she wields is at odds with her lovable image. It’s a soft, persuasive power, the kind that gets you on her side. It’s not only that she’s remarkably nice and easy to relate to, it’s that she’s smart, careful, deliberate, precise—both as a person and an actor. Anne Fletcher, who directed Aniston in her new Netflix movie, Dumplin’, says she’d be watching Aniston work and would notice a small, almost imperceptible hand gesture and think, “That’s [her character] Rosie. That’s not Jen. That is completely Rosie.” At a point when most successful actresses begin to wind down (not always by choice), Aniston shows no sign of slowing. In 2017, at the age of 48, she was ranked second on Forbes’s list of highest-paid actresses, and she makes millions a year in product endorsements. She’s about to start filming her new TV show, a dramedy about morning-news-show anchors, costarring Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carell, which was acquired by Apple in a bidding war. And soon she’ll appear in two more Netflix productions: Murder Mystery, with Adam Sandler, about a vacationing New York couple who become suspects in an elderly billionaire’s murder; and First Ladies, with Tig Notaro, about the first lesbian president of the United States.

Dumplin’, out now, was adapted by Hahn from a book by Julie Murphy. It is, among other things, a tribute to Dolly Parton. The filmmakers asked Parton to license her songs for the movie and write an original composition for the soundtrack. She and her collaborator, 4 Non Blondes’ Linda Perry, wound up writing six. Aniston, a lifelong Parton fan who’d named one of her dogs, yes, Dolly Parton, says that working with the legend was a thrill. During their first meeting, a dinner at Aniston’s house, Parton remembers asking, “Do you still have Dolly Parton? Can I meet her? I’ve always wanted to meet Dolly Parton.” (They met.) Later, when Aniston went to Perry’s studio to listen to the soundtrack, Parton says that “[Aniston] would listen to the song, and she would just cry and cry. You’ve got to be really sensitive for things to touch you like that.”

In Dumplin’, Aniston plays Rosie, a former pageant queen who now runs her small town’s teen beauty pageant. She is the single mother of a daughter, Willowdean (Danielle Macdonald of Patti Cake$), or Will, whom she calls Dumplin’. Will is overweight and resents that her mom seems to care more for the pageant girls than she does for her, so she signs up to compete. What starts out as a protest turns into a celebration of friendship and inclusivity. It’s a message that’s close to Aniston’s heart, because she is a girl’s girl and a friend person. Aniston and Hahn first met at a barbecue in Laurel Canyon when they were 19, when Aniston still lived in New York. “Jen was visiting her dad, and she came over. I remember it vividly, just turning around and seeing her and feeling like she was a long-lost sister of some kind, and not wanting her to leave. We just embraced her and we all became each other’s family and really helped each other. The show Friends was definitely kind of a parallel reality to our real lives.”

Hahn describes Aniston as their friend group’s “social glue.” “When she’s not in town, we almost don’t know what to do with ourselves,” she says. When I tell Aniston about this later, she laughs. “They don’t know what to do. They don’t know where to go. They don’t know how to eat. They don’t know how to socialize,” Aniston says. It’s been this way since they were in their twenties. “My house was always like the clubhouse. I love entertaining. I always have food. I think I probably got that from my mom, who always had her girlfriends over. I picked it up from my childhood—just always hearing girls in the house and learning how to make a good cheese board.”

“It’s the only place to point a finger at me as though it’s my damage—like it’s some sort of a scarlet letter on me that I haven’t yet procreated, or maybe won’t ever procreate.”

Aniston, whose parents divorced when she was young, says of her friends, “We always joke that we raised each other, we mothered each other, we sistered each other, we’ve been kids to each other.” She made her own family her own way. “I also was never a kid who sat around and dreamed about a wedding, you know? Those were never my fantasies. When I was first popped the question, it was so foreign to me.” That childhood environment, which she escaped through movies and TV and dreams of being an actress, led to her career. “My priorities weren’t about finding partnership and who am I gonna marry and what am I gonna wear on my wedding day. I was building houses with shoe boxes and toilet paper and felt. It was always about finding a home that felt safe. And I’m sure, because I was from a divorced-parent home, that was another reason I wasn’t like, ‘Well, that looks like a great institution.’ ”

Which is partly why the obsession with her love life rankles. “I don’t feel a void. I really don’t. My marriages, they’ve been very successful, in [my] personal opinion. And when they came to an end, it was a choice that was made because we chose to be happy, and sometimes happiness didn’t exist within that arrangement anymore. Sure, there were bumps, and not every moment felt fantastic, obviously, but at the end of it, this is our one life and I would not stay in a situation out of fear. Fear of being alone. Fear of not being able to survive. To stay in a marriage based on fear feels like you’re doing your one life a disservice. When the work has been put in and it doesn’t seem that there’s an option of it working, that’s okay. That’s not a failure. We have these clichés around all of this that need to be reworked and retooled, you know? Because it’s very narrow-minded thinking.” By endlessly focusing on her marital or family status, “you’re diminishing everything I have succeeded at, and that I have built and created,” she says. “It’s such a shallow lens that people look through. It’s the only place to point a finger at me as though it’s my damage—like it’s some sort of a scarlet letter on me that I haven’t yet procreated, or maybe won’t ever procreate.” Ultimately, she says, the idea of a happy ending is “a very romantic idea. It’s a very storybook idea. I understand it, and I think for some people it does work. And it’s powerful and it’s incredible and it’s admirable. Even enviable. But everybody’s path is different.”

Aniston has wanted to do a movie about the relationship between mothers and daughters for a long time. Part of what drew her to Dumplin’ was the way it echoed her own “challenging upbringing,” as she puts it. Aniston’s father, John, is a soap opera actor; he’s still on Days of Our Lives. Her mother, Nancy Dow, was a model and actress. Aniston came home one day when she was nine to the news that her father had moved out. She didn’t see him for a year. Her mother was often critical and was very focused on looks. “She was from this world of, ‘Honey, take better care of yourself,’ or ‘Honey, put your face on,’ or all of those odd sound bites that I can remember from my childhood.”

Aniston and her mom were famously estranged for years. “My mom said those things because she really loved me. It wasn’t her trying to be a bitch or knowing she would be making some deep wounds that I would then spend a lot of money to undo. She did it because that was what she grew up with. ‘You want to be happy. It’s hard for big girls.’ She was missing what was [actually] important. I think she was just holding on and doing the best she could, struggling financially and dealing with a husband who was no longer there. Being a single mom in the ’80s I’m sure was pretty crappy.”

Still, over time, Aniston has come to regard narrow beauty standards as a kind of prison. “We have to redefine what that is. It’s slowly been happening, but there’s still that mentality out there that wants to pit women against each other.” It’s the same thing, she feels, with social media. “I sound like a broken record, but it’s hard enough to just get out there as a kid, let alone ask for or seek out judgment.” Which is why she stays away. For someone as ubiquitous and relatable as Aniston, she is completely inaccessible by today’s standards. “The one thing I have is maintaining this little circle of sanctity that’s my own. If I’m sitting here posting something about my dogs or I’m Boomeranging my coffee mug in the morning, that’s just giving away one more piece of something that is mine.”

She’s purposefully protective of her private life, she says. “Look, I also don’t want to become…. There are times when I’ve found myself becoming a little too isolated. I don’t want to become that person, either. I don’t want to lose touch with what’s out in the world.” Not long ago, she was doing research for her show about morning-news anchors, and she went on YouTube. She was watching clips of different newscasters, and suddenly an old Diane Sawyer interview of her popped up. “And I clicked on it, and I just sat there riveted, only because I realized, Oh my God, I was really vulnerable! Somehow, along the way, I calloused up.”

The interview she’s talking about is from 2004, toward the end of Friends, right around the time the paparazzi started getting ferocious. Her own openness shocked her. “It’s just self-preservation. Because that was also a time, I think, when the internet was really taking off. The tabloids started painting me in a light that wasn’t true to who I was. Then I just was like, Shut up and say nothing, because there’s nothing you can do. You can try to protest too much—No, I’m not unhappy! No, I’m not this! I’m not that. I finally was like, I’m done. I’m going to shut the doors. I’m going to tune it out. If somebody tries to talk to me, I’ll give one-word answers, and I will not be vulnerable. I’m way too sensitive to be misinterpreted, misconstrued, or taken out of context. I just started to shut down.”

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It occurs to her that this may be one of the reasons why she started to branch out and do more characters that she could just disappear into. “Because I didn’t want to just be that person in the tabloids. I also had to prove it to myself. I’m not just that, right?” she says. “Look, we’re all human at the end of the day. I’m really still working on it. That’s just my own PTSD of being…how do I say this…it’s getting easy to maneuver around the city. It’s a matter of choosing when I feel like I’m okay with having a bunch of people take a bunch of pictures of me.”

After a while, Aniston shows me around her beautiful house, which she gut-renovated with her now ex, Justin Theroux. The couple’s separation was announced in February; that same month, the house was featured in Architectural Digest. Aside from some editing of the family-room picture wall, not much seems to have changed. The space is at once cozy and dramatic, full of dark leather and wood, furry pillows.

“I don’t feel a void. I really don’t. My marriages, they’ve been very successful, in [my] personal opinion.”

It feels intimate on a grand scale, or maybe it’s the other way around. “It’s a big house,” she says, “but it also has big rooms.” They hold a lot of people. She does plan to redo the dining room, “but that’s because I can never not do something,” she says. She’s still building and rebuilding her dream house, only not with shoe boxes anymore. We go out on the terrace, and she shows me the pool below. “This is where, every Sunday, we do ‘Sunday Fundays,’ as we call it, where [my friends’] kids come and we huddle around down there and they jump around in the pool.”

“I marvel at how she has remained as grounded as a person could possibly be in that situation, and also at the fact that she worked hard at nurturing the friendships that she always had while she had this big life, this big career,” says Hahn, a frequent Sunday Funday guest. “She’s always stayed so humble, and I’m not just saying that. She’s been able to stay connected to people who don’t have the same financial reality or work reality. She does live in a rarefied world, but she’s not a rarefied person.”

As for whether she’ll have her own children, Aniston is still uncertain. She admits the prospect always felt “quite honestly, kind of frightening.” She continues, “Some people are just built to be wives and have babies. I don’t know how naturally that comes to me.” But as in many aspects of her life, she’s still open to other possibilities. “Who knows what the future holds in terms of a child and a partnership— how that child comes in…or doesn’t? And now with science and miracles, we can do things at different times than we used to be able to.”

Aniston attributes this flexibility to her sense of inner contentment, disconnected from career success. “I’ve always been predominantly a happy person,” Aniston says. “Especially once I got out of my [mother’s] house. Not that it was horrible and unpleasant, but it had its challenges. I found myself as happy when I was waitressing at Jackson Hole as I feel now. I think that’s also a survival technique from coming from a home that wasn’t always that way. I have chosen to use what I grew up with as an example of what I do not want to be or live in. It’s a glass-half-full kind of thing. Always being open. Allowing myself to feel what I feel. What brings me happiness? I have a great job. I have a great family. I have great friends. I have no reason to feel otherwise. If I did, I would need to go get an attitude shift, a perspective shift.” The sun is setting, and it takes her by surprise. “What the hell, we’re having a beautiful sunset!”

written by Admin on December 10, 2019

Ellen’s Greatest Night of Giveaways

Jennifer co-hosted Ellen’s Greatest Nights of Giveaways, I have added photos to the gallery enjoy!

written by Admin on November 16, 2019

The Morning Show First 3 Episodes Screencaptures

Hi folks, the first 3 episodes of Jen’s new project “The Morning Show” have been released, I have added screencaptures to the gallery enjoy!



written by Admin on November 10, 2019

2019 E! People’s Choice Awards

Jennifer attended the 2019 E! People’s Choice Awards in which herself and her Murder Mystery co-star Adam Sandler won The Comedy Movie of 2019, enjoy viewing photos!

written by Admin on November 07, 2019

SAG-AFTRA Foundation’s 4th Annual Patron of the Artists Awards

Jennifer attended the SAG-AFTRA Foundation’s 4th Annual Patron of the Artists Awards, I have added photos to our gallery enjoy!


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